Trail Guide: 7 Adventures in Wisconsin’s Bayfield Peninsula

After living in Bayfield, Wisconsin for almost a full month, I completely see why the small Lake Superior town is a major tourist attraction. Between guiding kayak trips and exploring the area for myself by foot, I’ve come up with a fairly solid list of highlights of the Bayfield Peninsula.

Houghton Falls Nature Preserve

With sandstone cliffs, views of Lake Superior, and seasonal waterfalls, this 1.5-mile trail is an easy hike and a must visit. Be aware that in many areas going off trail is trespassing on private property, and the Bayfield Regional Conservancy asks hikers not to wander into the streamed, as it contributes to erosion.

Catch a Little Sand Bay Sunset

IMG_9111.jpg
Sunset behind Sand Island in the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore

One of the best spots to watch the sun set over Lake Superior might be Little Sand Bay. Here you can watch the sun sink behind Sand Island, and stroll down the pier, and out to a small river/estuary.

Corny Beach

Looking for a place to swim and get some of the best smoked fish around? Look no further than the small town of Cornucopia, right on Lake Superior. If you’re looking to add some mileage to your beach day check out nearby Lost Creek Falls for a little over a 2 mile hike. 

Kayaking the Sea Caves in the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore

IMG_0304
“The Crack”, Mainland Sea Caves, Apostle Islands National Lakeshore

The Mainland Sea Caves are often what brings people out to Bayfield, and fairly so. Objectively glamorous, the sea caves are an incredible experience, and kayaking is probably the best way to really experience these caves.

That being said, there are a few things to keep in mind. The first thing to remember is that Lake Superior isn’t really a lake; it is a freshwater sea. Just last fall, a 28.8 foot wave was recorded near Marquette, Michigan, and the weather at the Sea Caves can change very quickly, from glass to dangerous in under an hour. Kayakers should use ONLY sea kayaks, and have spray skirts, wetsuits, PFDs (which you should actually wear!!!), a bilge pump, a paddle float, first aid kit, and extra water, and all of this at the very least.

If you are going to paddle the sea caves and you have access to all of this equipment, great! Make sure you can either self-rescue or you are with someone who can T-rescue—preferably both. I would also recommend checking the marine forecast, and understanding what that forecast means. At the Mainland Caves, strong wind from the Northeast generates pretty large waves that can rebound off the cliff walls.

All this to say, if you don’t have sea kayaking experience and access to equipment, going with an outfitter is an excellent and much safer way to experience the sea caves! Check out Living Adventure and their various tour options here!

Kayaking the Islands

IMG_0460.JPG
Looking East from the Oak Island Dock after sunset

While the Mainland Sea Caves are awesome, the whole of the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore features more, less accessed sea caves. By touring the islands on a multi-day sea kayaking trip, you can experience more remote caves and garner some more experience sea kayaking. Check out Living Adventure’s different multi-day trips!

(For staff training this year we did a three day overnight that looked something like Beaches, Waves and Caves, but with a lot more capsizing and rescue practice! The sea caves on Sand Island are incredible, (even when you’re upside down in a kayak and freezing in them) and having lunch on the Raspberry Island Sandspit might be one of my favorite experiences to date, sunburn included. The photo above was taken from the Oak Island dock during an overnight trip. If you’re at all up for some island camping and interested in paddling, this is really the sort of experience you want to have in this lakeshore.)

Hike Meyers Beach Sea Caves

IMG_0236.JPG
“The Crack” from the hiking trail above rather than from the water

If you don’t get out in a kayak to the Sea Caves don’t stress too much—you can experience the caves from above the cliff line at the Meyers Beach. This trail is usually considered to be moderate, and is as long as you make it. Keep your eyes peeled for black bear, which are known to frequent the area.

Apostle Islands Grand Tour

IMG_0351.JPG
Devil’s Island Sea Caves 

Hop on one of the cruises starting in Bayfield to get a three hour tour of the Apostle Islands from a ferry! Try for the top deck of the boat for the best view, but be sure to dress warm—the air up there is cold and it only gets colder the farther out you go!

Questions, comments, concerns? Feel free to leave me a message below!

 

 

 

Trail Guide: Sleeping Bear’s “Dune Climb”

The Dune Climb is one of those hikes that everyone tells you is hard, and you believe them, but it still doesn’t stop you from going. The idea of climbing over the sand until you reach the water is too appealing to stop most people, especially since that first dune sticks out like a sore thumb when you’re cruising M22. And even if you’ve done the Dune Climb before, and actually know how long it is, odds are you’ll forget the next time you’re out there.

So what do you need to know before attempting of one of the more difficult hikes in Michigan?

Mileage: It’s 3.5-4 miles roundtrip, depending on which trail/ detours you take—but it’s over large dunes for the majority of the hike. The hike will usually take 2 to 4 hours, depending on skill level and time spent at Lake Michigan. 

What you should know: While you might want to start the hike off barefoot, you will want to bring a pair of shoes or socks for the section of the hike that is closer to the lakeshore—here there can be sharp rocks and even broken glass.

You will not be able to see the lake immediately. Not after the first dune, or the second, or the third. When you do finally see the Lake, you are about halfway there.

IMG_6459-1
After 1.5 hours of hiking, we finally reached the beach

If it is cool enough to have a comfortable climb out, it is probably too cold to swim in the lake. This is probably the biggest catch 22 of the hike—ideally, the hike would be cool and the lake would be hot, not the other way around. Unfortunately, the Dunes are about ten degrees hotter than the Lakeshore, so you could easily be hot hiking, but cold by the time you get to the water.

You will probably be sore the next day. Hiking up sand is a different type of work out than running or hiking.

What you should bring:

Water: this hike is hot, hard, and in the sun. I have done it without water before, but it was back when I was running cross country, and even then it was a mistake.

Shoes: you might want to take off your shoes at the first hill, but the second half of the hike is rockier, and sometimes even has broken glass.

Sunscreen: There is no tree cover in the Dunes—this entire hike is in the sun

National Parks Pass: To access the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, you will either need a National Parks Pass or a Sleeping Bear Dunes pass, both of which you can purchase at the entrance to the Dune Climb.

Lake Michigan
Cairn at Lake Michigan

Is This Hike Worth It?

If your goal with this hike is to swim in Lake Michigan and experience some incredible views, this hike probably isn’t right for you. You can just as easily visit one of the many other trails or beaches in Sleeping Bear and get a much better result for less work.

However, if your goal is to get a good workout or check this one off your bucket list, I would absolutely recommend this hike!

Trail Guide: 5 Must See Sights in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains

North Carolina was not the first place that came to mind when I was looking for hiking destinations, but after stumbling upon the Roan Highlands on the internet, I decided to give North Carolina a closer look.

I quickly discovered the North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains have so much more to offer than just mountains—I found waterfalls, sweeping overlooks, thigh-burning hikes, and would 100% recommend you visit yourself. When you do, here are five places to get you started on that visit.

Linville Falls

IMG_5458-1.jpgThe Linville Falls are a quick detour off the Blue Ridge Parkway, and one of the most intricate waterfalls I have seen. As a photographer, I was thrilled, because the waterfall offers so many different angles and has so much character. At the first overlook you can see the upper falls, a small set of twin cascades. Also at this first overlook the waterfall cuts its way into the rock, forming a small canyon.

The second and third overlooks give you the more classic view of the lower falls featured above. If you zoom in on this photo, you can see a man in orange taking a selfie near the base of the falls—you can reach his location by taking a third, more difficult trail.

Hawksbill Crag

IMG_5489-1Hawksbill Crag is a steep mile climb up to an overlook of the Linville Gorge. It is well trafficked, and for good reason! The blooming flowers and rock formations at the top alone are impressive, but the views of the valley below are the sort you would expect to see only from a helicopter.

A word of caution: The last portion of this hike features steeper hiking that borders on climbing. I would recommend a walking stick.

Roan Highlands

IMG_5661-1A bit of a drive off the Blue Ridge Parkway, but I will sing the praises of this hike until the day that I die. The trail from Carver’s Gap to Grassy Bald is five miles round trip, and follows the Appalachian Trail for a portion as it winds down the border between North Carolina and Tennessee.

Elk Falls

IMG_5530-1A more hidden gem, Elk Falls are hard to find, but offer the chance to get really close to a lesser known waterfall. Whatever you do, don’t jump from the top—the 40 foot drop and rip currents below claim lives every year.

The Blue Ridge Parkway

IMG_5334-1

The entire Blue Ridge Parkway scenic drive is worth your time, and there are plenty more sights to discover along the way!

 

Did I miss anything? Let me know!

 

Trail Guide: 6 Killer Hiking Trails in Kentucky’s Red River Gorge

For Kentuckians, the Red River Gorge is known and loved both for its climbing and trails. I am not a climber, nor should I be at a lowly 5’2, so I stuck to the trails on my recent visit.

The Gorge, as it is lovingly referred to by locals, offers tons of different trails for almost all skill levels, all with different activities and sights to see. Some of the best seasons to visit the Gorge are in Spring and Fall, with the flowers blooming and leaves changing respectively. From arches to vistas, this Red River Gorge Trail Guide covers 6 hikes in the Gorge worth a visit!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Whistling Arch Trail: At around a half mile round trip and minimal elevation gain, this trail offers a sizable arch and an overlook over the valley below. The Red River Gorge has about 150 arches, its arch concentration second only to Utah’s Arches National Park.

Angel’s Windows Trail: Another short and sweet hike, this trail offers a double arch. The trail is about a half mile total and has little elevation change. Of the two arches we visited, this was by far the more photogenic, with the arch on the far side looking oddly like a horse.

Jump Rock: This is more of a swimming hole than a hike, but still well worth the trip. From the Sheltowee Connector Trail #211 lot off Sky Bridge Rd, it is a quick walk out to Jump Rock along the Red River. The rock is safe to jump off and the river is safe to swim across, although I would still recommend being a strong swimmer, and wouldn’t tell anyone to dive. The current is not strong, and the river is deep enough that you don’t have to worry about hurting yourself jumping. When we went, there were about 40 yellow monarch butterflies around the river and the surrounding trials.

Disclaimer: I did not jump or swim here, because it was 64 degrees when we visited. My sister swam, and has jumped with a group in the past.

The Natural Bridge and Hanson’s Point Trails: Located in Natural Bridge State Park rather than the Red River Gorge, the Natural Bridge is a short but steeper hike from the parking lot in the Natural Bridge State Park. The Natural Bridge is what it sounds like—a bridge of sandstone connecting two ridges and carved out by the wind that you can hike across. From the top of the Natural Bridge, you can see Hanson’s Point—a local told me that the overlook was called this but I haven’t been able to confirm online. After crossing the Natural Bridge, you can head out to Hanson’s Point to get a view of the bridge from a distance. From here, we continued out to Lookout Point to watch the sunset. Lookout Point offers really nice views of the valley below, and is arguably the best spot in the Natural Bridge State Park to watch the sunset.

Tip for Red River Gorge photos: I have heard that fog collects in the valley below the Natural Bridge and Hanson’s Point in the morning, both of which face the east, and it is a really cool place to shoot the sunrise above the clouds.

Devil’s Staircase Trail: Located in the Natural Bridge State Park between Hanson’s Point and Lookout Point, this “staircase” will lead you deep into walls of rock. It’s a cool and short hike, but not if you have bad knees, don’t like heights, or are not steady footed. Honestly it’s amazing what this park will call a staircase. I can’t believe I did that stupid hike.

Copperas Falls Trail (Copperas Creek Falls Trail): This is an unofficial trail near Osborne Bend Trial, and is a little tricky to follow. If you can see Copperas Creek or the creek bed, you are headed in the right direction. This hike is just shy of four miles round trip and doesn’t have a whole lot of elevation gain, but you will have to climb over some trees, and even large rocks depending on which route you take. When you first start off on the trail, it will split off into two. Following the trail on the right will give you a faster and easier route to the falls. We followed to the left. It was probably more scenic, but we had to climb over boulders the size of cars, and I have cuts and bruises. From here, the trial has multiple creek crossings, so be aware that your feet might get wet. In general, I would not recommend hiking this trail. You can see other, more impressive falls without scraping yourself up as much. If you are going to go, I would recommend going earlier than May or after a big rain—the falls were more of a trickle than falls by the time we got there.

The other thing about Copperas Falls is that there was a lot of trash lining the hike. I was able to get some of it, but I’m sure there will be more if you get the chance to visit, so bring a trash bag to collect as you go! It can seem like a pain to pick up after someone else, but if not you, who else will do it? Besides, there is no better way to appreciate nature than to leave a place better than you found it.

For more hikes and Red River Gorge Trail Guides check out these other sites/blogs:

Top 10 Hikes in Red River Gorge

“Challenging” Top Ten Hikes in the Red River Gorge

Kentucky’s Epic Red River Gorge that You’ve Probably Never Heard Of