Trail Guide: 5 Adventures in Michigan’s Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore

Michigan’s Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore is known for its waterfalls, clear water, and of course, it’s cliffs. There are many different ways to experience the rocks, ranging from boat tours to backcountry hiking.

Last week, my brother and I spent a few days kayaking, hiking, and adventuring in the area. Here’s what we did, and what we would recommend!

Kayak Lake Superior:

Kayaking Lake Superior and the Pictured Rocks has always been a bucket-lister for me, and I am glad to have had the chance to check it off. Lake Superior can be unpredictable and choppy—record wave height on Lake Superior was 51 feet recorded in Whitefish Bay.

That being said, only sea kayaks should be taken out on the Lake—not canoes or recreational kayaks. Before you kayak on Lake Superior, check out the information available on the NPS site.

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Pictured Rocks sea caves from the water

Rather than rent a kayak, we opted for a morning tour with Paddling Michigan. The waves were an average 3 feet when we went. We had a blast, paddling to Miner’s Castle from Miner’s Beach, then past that along the cliffs a ways further. Through Paddling Michigan, you can take a smaller, “soft” adventure tour—this is what I did with my younger brother, and it was plenty—or you can take longer, full trips or even overnight trips down the Lakeshore.

***EDIT: After a summer working as a kayak guide in a different region of Lake Superior I WOULD NOT recommend this company. The guide ratio was near 1 guide to 12 people which is UNSAFE in this region, especially with a 3 foot average wave height. You sit approximately three feet out of the water in a kayak. With a three foot wave average you may not be able to see the paddlers next to you. IN ADDITION we were FAR too close to the cliff line and hung out in a rebound zone for at least 30 minutes, where 3 foot waves rebound to 6. In fact, unless you have full safety equipment, can self-rescue, and are familiar with the weather and wave patterns in the region, I would recommend you just not paddle the Pictured Rocks at all. To my current knowledge, there is no outfitter there that I would recommend that follows appropriate safety practices.

(Further evidence: I asked my guide at the time what happens if someone flips in those conditions, and he replied “I have a T-rescue.” We were all in tandem kayaks, and it should be noted that you literally cannot T-rescue a tandem. T-rescues are used for single kayaks. There is a completely different rescue for a tandem kayak. So this dude had no idea what he was talking about.)

So instead of risking hypothermia and Coast Guard rescue, just hike the rocks instead, or maybe consider hiring a private guide. Either way, do your research.

Kayaking offers a different perspective on the rocks, and the chance to see sea caves and waterfalls. You can get a similar experience from a boat tour, but a kayak gets you closer to the rocks and gives you the sense that you explored the rocks, rather than took a tour.

Visit Waterfalls/ Overlooks:

A good place to start water-falling is Miner’s Castle road. Here, you can stop at Miner’s Falls, a one and a quarter mile round trip hike from the parking lot. From here, driving farther down Miner’s Castle road, you can visit the Miner’s Castle overlook. If it is a hot enough day, Miner’s Beach is just off the same road too, and is a good place to picnic and swim.

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Munising Falls in the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore

Just outside of Munising is Munising Falls, a short hike with two different viewing platforms.

Chapel and Mosquito Falls can both be reached from the Chapel-Mosquito area trailhead, with a three mile round trip hike to Chapel Falls, and two miles round trip to Mosquito Falls. The two can be hit together in the Chapel Basin Loop hike, detailed below.

Hike the Chapel Basin Loop:

We took an afternoon to do this hike, but could have easily taken longer with all of the great places to take in the view or stop and swim! The loop is 10 miles roundtrip if you want to hit Chapel Falls, Chapel Beach, Mosquito Falls, and Mosquito Beach (NPS map linked here).

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View on the Chapel Basin Loop, Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore

Chapel Falls is a cool stop, with an opportunity to get up close to the falls before they plunge of a rock shelf into Chapel Lake. The trail continues along to Chapel Rock and Chapel Beach. This is sometimes treated as an out and back to the Beach, where you can swim both in Lake Superior and Chapel Creek. Chapel Creek meets Lake Superior in a small waterfall that you can slide down and play in.

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Natural waterslide at Chapel Beach

From here, you continue down the beach along the North Country Trail toward Mosquito Beach. This portion of the hike is along the cliffs, and one of the coolest stretches of trail I have ever hiked. There are countless scenic overlooks, and almost all of the 4.5 miles are along the cliffs.

When you reach Mosquito Beach, the trail becomes a little more difficult to follow due to poor signage and about 800 side trails leading to the beach and to the backcountry campsites. You are going to want to cross the Mosquito River, then follow the sign posts to Mosquito Falls rather than continue hiking on the North Country Trail.

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Sea caves and Lover’s Leap Arch along the Chapel Basin Loop

Rather than hike the full loop like we did, I would recommend cutting Mosquito Beach and Falls, and hiking out to Grand Portal Point from Chapel Beach, and then returning via the Chapel Lake spur from Chapel Beach. The majority of the impressive cliffs were all before Grand Portal Point, and all worth seeing twice. After this point, the cliffs are less impressive, and the trail is muddier and less maintained. Hiking from Chapel Falls to Chapel Beach, then on to Grand Portal Point and then backtracking until the Chapel Lake Spur makes for a 9.5 miles roundtrip hike.

Hike to Spray Falls:

We hit this hike around 5 pm made it back to the car around 9, and the lighting was beautiful. Even in August, the trail was empty, and the Coves, a worth stop along the way to Spray Falls, offer some of the best swimming in Lake Superior.

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Spray Falls as viewed from the North Country Trail

Spray Falls plunge 70 feet from the cliffs into Lake Superior, and can be viewed from two different overlooks as well as from behind.

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A beach at The Coves, as viewed from the North Country Trail

We started at the trailhead at the Little Beaver Creek Campground. From here it is a 1.5 mile hike out to Lake Superior, and then 2.5 miles out to Spray Falls, making for an 8 mile out and back. Check out the NPS maps here (scroll down; it’s the second map).

Swim in Lake Superior:

Lake Superior is cold even in the summer, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t swimmable! The water feels great after a long hike.

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The south end of Chapel Beach, viewed from the North Country Trail

One popular location is Chapel Beach—a 3-mile hike in on the Chapel Basin Loop (above) offers a sandy beach, waterfall to play in, and backcountry camping sites nearby. Accessed from the same trailhead, Mosquito Beach is a rocky rather than sandy beach and can be slippery.

Miner’s Beach off Miner’s Castle Road is a popular kayak launch point as it is sheltered by cliffs, and an easily accessed swimming spot. From here, you can hike east to Miner’s Beach Falls (or Elliot’s Falls), a small waterfall on the Beach.

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Swimming in the crystal clear water of The Coves

My favorite swimming spot we visited was The Coves, along the North Country Trail on the Spray Falls out and back. The water was clear and calm, and there were even good spots to jump off rocks into the water.

 

We didn’t get a chance to backpack, do a boat tour, or surf, but all of those are other adventures to have in the Pictured Rocks area. Check out the National Parks Service’s more comprehensive list of activities here.

Like the Pictured Rocks? Interested in a similar experience? Check out the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore!

For an updated Pictured Rocks Guide click HERE!

Top Photo Locations in the Sleeping Bear Dunes

The Sleeping Bear Dune National Lakeshore is arguably one of the most scenic locations in Michigan. It boasts beautiful blue green water, stunning overlooks, and beautiful beaches. The Dunes offer a lot to work with, but it can be hard to know where to start.

From Pyramid Point by Leelanau, south to Point Betsie by Frankfort, here are scenic locations in the Sleeping Bear Dunes.

Pyramid Point

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Pyramid Point is located in the northern portion of the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, and is a quick walk from the parking lot out to the overlook. On a clear day, you can see both the North and South Manitou Islands from the bluff.

Glen Lake Overlook

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One of the first stops on the Pierce Stocking Scenic Drive, this overlook offers a view of Glen Lake in one direction, and the dunes themselves in the other direction. The last time I was there, I was able to see clouds weaving in and out of the hills and lake below me.

Overlook 9

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Overlook 9 is the most popular stop on the Pierce Stocking Scenic Drive and with good reason. The overlook is perched high above Lake Michigan and offers views of both dunes, bluffs, and the Lake in every direction. This overlook is the perfect place to watch the sunset over Lake Michigan.

North Bar Lake Overlook

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While Overlook 9 gets most of the attention, the North Bar Lake Overlook is my favorite. You can see both M22 below, North Bar Lake, and the Empire Bluffs in the distance all at what feels like a bird’s eye view.

Empire Bluffs Trail

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By far my favorite hike in Michigan, the Empire Bluffs are also a good place to watch the sunset. It is a 1.5-mile roundtrip hike out to the bluffs, and the majority of the hike is wooded.

Point Betsie Lighthouse

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South of Sleeping Bear, Point Betsie Lighthouse is a fun historic lighthouse to visit and another pretty place to watch the sunset, this time from the beach rather than an overlook.

Want more in Northern Michigan? Check out some of my other posts:

Trail Guide: Sleeping Bear’s “Dune Climb”

Sleeping Bear National Lakeshore: Places to Visit in the Off-Season

Wilderness State Park and Winter Shoreline

Honest Lessons From Study Abroad

About a year ago, I left for a study abroad that would take me to Ireland, England and Wales. And I had a good time, I really did. But was it life changing? Eye-opening? Am I suddenly cultured? No. Studying abroad for three weeks in countries that spoke my language did not drastically change my world view, but it was still a growing experience.

I traveled with a group of 11 girls I had never met before, so my experience was more interpersonal than it was cultural, which I don’t necessarily think is a bad thing.

So if I wouldn’t describe it as “eye-opening” or “life changing”, what all did I learn?

There is no one right way to travel

I personally like to travel quickly, efficiently, and always be early.Some people would rather soak up the experience of everything. Neither way is necessarily wrong, but travel with people who travel like you. If you don’t, you will end up either waiting around for people or feeling rushed.

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Trinity College, Dublin

Not everyone is going to like you

On one level, I knew before this study abroad that people aren’t always going to like you. On another level, I didn’t really expect people to dislike me when I was trying so hard to be liked.

The thing about traveling with a group of 19-21-year-old females, is someone is going to be the mean girl. Sometimes, more than one person is going to be the mean girl. And when you’re travelling in close quarters for three weeks, it’s going to be even harder to get along.

So while at first it bothered me when one girl decided that I was the B-word for being chronically early (no, that is not an exaggeration), and it bothered me when another girl didn’t like the way I asked her to clean the dishes that she had left in the sink for three days because we were literally out of dishes (also not an exaggeration), I eventually shrugged it off. I would rather have clean dishes than be liked by mean people anyway (this is an exaggeration. I would rather be liked).

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A castle in West Ireland out a tour bus window, iPhone editing circa 2016

Sometimes people are just mean

On a similar note, some people are just mean. Sometimes, you meet someone who you really can’t get along with, who really will yell at you for getting in her way, and who will say nasty things about you just for the sport of it. And sometimes you will have to sit next to them on a 7-hour flight and be nice even when they elbow you all 7 hours. Some people are like that.

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River Thames at night

A three-week study abroad might not be the best way to experience culture

I was really hoping to leave the British Isles with some deep understanding of how things work there, and some wild experience that made me feel cultured. Instead, I got interpersonal experience that I wasn’t expecting. I lived and traveled with a girl who was messy and rude, and did not care what her roommates thought. I lived and traveled with a girl so far removed from the world I understood that I could not possibly relate, and another girl who insisted that she tell us all how to travel, and even how to walk down a street. I lived and traveled with another girl who became one of my best friends, and I wouldn’t trade the bonding experience we had for the world.

My original goal of learning about a culture that wasn’t my own wasn’t necessarily accomplished, but I got a different sort of cultural experience that I would argue is just as valuable.

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Stonehenge on the Summer Solstice, featuring Druids

Reading will enhance your experience

It just will. Researching a place before visiting sounds like a lot of work, but you will get so much more out of seeing a place of significance if you understand its significance and know its stories.

For example, when we visited the Sherlock Holmes museum, I didn’t really get much out of it, because I don’t read Sherlock Holmes. But the historical places, Newgrange passage tomb, the Tower of London, Ireland’s Museum of Archeology, meant a lot more to me, because I had read both the history of the places and countries I was in, and a lot of the folklore. Because I had done this research, I wanted to see these places, not just because they were pretty or interesting, but because I understood what they meant.

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If you google “english village”, there’s a photo that looks like this probably

Travel isn’t scary

I remember getting up at 7am to catch a 3pm flight at the beginning of this trip, and being insanely nervous about navigating the airport. By the end of the trip, I took a ferry and two planes in the course of 36 hours, and then had a 27-hour flight delay in JFK. Sure, I was stressed and sleep deprived, but not scared. Because whether you’ve missed a train or been stuck on the Atlanta tarmac for 3 hours in June, the situation can almost always be resolved.

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That one iPhone photo that turned out surprisingly clear; Norwich, England

You accommodate the culture you are visiting; not the other way around

This is something that I wouldn’t have thought really needed iteration, but one of the things I saw repeatedly from a few of my peers was an expectation that things would be done the way they are in America because it is the “best way”.

First of all, never say that the way things are done in your home country are better than they are in the country you are in. That is obscenely rude. Second, especially don’t do it if you are an American. Especially an American in London. Like, holy shit.

Moreover, the way things are done in your home country are not, without exception, the best way. I listened to two of my peers complain about not being able to use business’s trash cans in Europe despite having not bought anything from the business. While these two idiots complained loudly, as Americans do, we got the evil eye from like forty people before I quietly explained to them that trash bags here are more expensive to encourage recycling, so businesses can’t afford to just take their trash.

Which shut them up for about half a second before they loudly began discussing how the Euro is stronger than the Pound. Which is wrong.

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Norwich Castle; sweet dungeons, but not much else

You don’t have to always tag along

One of the things about living with a group of people somewhere new is that there will always be something fun and new going on, and you will want to be involved. I learned pretty quickly that sometimes it is better to get some rest and alone time than to rush out to the third or fourth sight of the day, and people won’t hate you for passing every now and then.

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The time I thought the wind would literally blow me into the Ocean

Your dream experience is not that important

Everyone has this vision of what their study abroad, or even vacation, should be, but achieving this vision is not more important than being courteous.
I cannot count how many times, on this trip alone, I heard someone say “well it’s a once in a lifetime chance,” before doing something inconsiderate or downright mean.

When a group I was traveling with left me alone for a half an hour somewhere in the middle of the Tower of London I was told by one girl upon their return that she couldn’t pass up a once in a lifetime chance to see the crown jewels by waiting 20 seconds for me to return from the bathroom (not exaggerating).

When the girl who made our entire tour bus late at the Cliffs of Moher finally boarded a full bus she shrugged and told us how buying that Guinness pint glass was a once in a lifetime experience (it wasn’t). Meanwhile, someone across the aisle of the bus muttered “Americans” under his breath.

So no, you’re “right” to a once in a lifetime experience doesn’t give you license to be a jerk. Just don’t do it.

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Cardiff Castle, Wales

Studying abroad is expensive

Another thing worth mentioning– this kind of program, a faculty led, country hopping, study abroad, can be really expensive, and I personally don’t think I would do this again. Traveling independently and doing your own research will be a lot cheaper, and you aren’t bound to a class itinerary.

On the other hand, there absolutely are scholarships available for this kind of program, and there are a lot of them– several of the girls on my trip were able to cut the program cost down by 75%. Talk to your advisor, talk to your schools Office of Study Abroad, and look and see if your school has a Student Travel Association. All of these people/resources should be able to help you find scholarships and get discounted flights.

So is a study abroad right for you?

I can’t really answer that. I think for me, at that time, this study abroad was probably the right introduction to travel. But for other people, who are looking to have a little more autonomy than travel training wheels, I would recommend direct enrolling in a foreign university for a full semester, or traveling with a small group.

 

 

 

 

 

Starting College: The Dos and Don’ts of Planning Your Future

There is a lot of pressure on high school graduates to choose their career path and set up their lives right away, and maybe you’re feeling that right now, and that’s why you’re here. I know I felt that pressure 4 years ago, when I was trying to figure out what I wanted to do with my life.

It wasn’t a straight path for me—I thought I wanted to be a doctor, and after a few months volunteering in the ER and vomiting at the sight of blood, I realized that I didn’t. Then I thought I wanted to be a professor, but then I looked at the years and years more of school I would have to complete, and that didn’t seem right either.

I still don’t know “what I want to do”, and I will be graduating in less than a year—which believe me is scary to write.

While I don’t know what I want to do for the rest of my life, I do know what my immediate options are, which is a much easier and arguably better way to look at it. More importantly, I know how to cope with stress and actually plan these things better than I used to, which is why I am laying this out here.

DO: Explore Majors

People will inevitably tell you what major is the best, and what you should do to be successful. Keep in mind all people give advice based their own experience, and no one knows just how many majors and different paths might be available to you. Attend your college events, meet with different advisors, and talk to upper classmen—the more people you talk to, the better sense you’ll have of all the opportunities available.

Estee and I: Tahquamenon Falls
My roommate and best friend of 15 years  and I on our Spring Break mini- Road Trip

DON’T: Be Stubborn

It took me a long time to fully admit that I didn’t want to be a doctor, because I had already told people that I did. In the long run, this hurt me more than helped, and I spent a lot of time, money, and effort on classes I wasn’t interested in and I probably won’t need.

My advice? Don’t even declare a major until you’ve got a good sense of all of the majors available—and don’t hang onto a major just because your friends and family think that you should.

DO: Get Involved

Everyone will tell you this, but go to club meetings, join the IM soccer team, attend events. Not only is this a great way to meet people, but this also lets explore your campus.

Another perk of getting involved— you end up meeting a lot of upperclassmen who can give you advice specific to your school and maybe even your major.

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Claire, my sister, about to skip into her freshman year

DON’T: Assume There is Only One Right Way

One of the biggest issues, for both me and many of my friends was assuming that there is only one right way to do things— there’s not. Take a gap year, go to a community college for a few years, it’s not the end of the world. And if college isn’t right for you, that’s okay too.

Two of the most successful people I know either took a gap year or transferred from a community college. Just because people “usually” go straight to a four year university, doesn’t mean that it’s the best way or that it’s the right way for you.

DO: Get a Job

The cool thing about college campuses is that you can get a career-relevant paid position, but you have to put yourself out there.

My freshman year, I went out on a limb and emailed the campus Writing Center to see if they needed tutors. I’ve worked there for two years now, and it funneled into my second job, where I act as a peer mentor and teach writing to freshman science majors—to whom I impart all of my life advice that doesn’t make it on to this blog.

My sister’s freshman year, she emailed 6 professors to see if they needed an undergraduate researcher. Only 1 of the 6 even replied, but this professor gave her a paid position this summer in his lab working on solar panels—I’m pretty sure she just gets coffee and cleans beakers, but still. I have another friend whose freshman lab experience got her an internship at a National Park. In contrast, most of the people I know who have put off getting jobs and getting involved are having trouble finding jobs after graduation.

Your freshman or sophomore job, be it in a cafeteria or a research position, can lead to bigger opportunities down the road, but you have to be willing to put yourself out there.

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Hannah, one of the first friends I made at college, and I at Pyramid Point

DON’T: Try and Plan Your Life in One Day

You might feel like you need to figure it out today, or tomorrow, but I promise you don’t. I’m not necessarily saying put off everything forever, but you don’t need to choose a major, or a career path right away.

Instead, focus on trying out classes and going to club meetings. That way, when it comes time to make decisions, you have a good idea of what your options are.

DO: Make Your Own Path

Don’t choose a major or career just because your parents did it that way, or all your friends are doing it that way— you have to do it for you. At the end of the day, you’re going to be a lot happier and more successful if you do something you actually like than you will be if you live your life to make someone else happy.

DON’T: Stress

You’ve got time. Whether you’re going to be a senior in high school and don’t know what major in, or a senior in college and don’t know what to do with your whole life (me), or anywhere in-between, it’s going to work out.

 

 

Trail Guide: 5 Must See Sights in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains

North Carolina was not the first place that came to mind when I was looking for hiking destinations, but after stumbling upon the Roan Highlands on the internet, I decided to give North Carolina a closer look.

I quickly discovered the North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains have so much more to offer than just mountains—I found waterfalls, sweeping overlooks, thigh-burning hikes, and would 100% recommend you visit yourself. When you do, here are five places to get you started on that visit.

Linville Falls

IMG_5458-1.jpgThe Linville Falls are a quick detour off the Blue Ridge Parkway, and one of the most intricate waterfalls I have seen. As a photographer, I was thrilled, because the waterfall offers so many different angles and has so much character. At the first overlook you can see the upper falls, a small set of twin cascades. Also at this first overlook the waterfall cuts its way into the rock, forming a small canyon.

The second and third overlooks give you the more classic view of the lower falls featured above. If you zoom in on this photo, you can see a man in orange taking a selfie near the base of the falls—you can reach his location by taking a third, more difficult trail.

Hawksbill Crag

IMG_5489-1Hawksbill Crag is a steep mile climb up to an overlook of the Linville Gorge. It is well trafficked, and for good reason! The blooming flowers and rock formations at the top alone are impressive, but the views of the valley below are the sort you would expect to see only from a helicopter.

A word of caution: The last portion of this hike features steeper hiking that borders on climbing. I would recommend a walking stick.

Roan Highlands

IMG_5661-1A bit of a drive off the Blue Ridge Parkway, but I will sing the praises of this hike until the day that I die. The trail from Carver’s Gap to Grassy Bald is five miles round trip, and follows the Appalachian Trail for a portion as it winds down the border between North Carolina and Tennessee.

Elk Falls

IMG_5530-1A more hidden gem, Elk Falls are hard to find, but offer the chance to get really close to a lesser known waterfall. Whatever you do, don’t jump from the top—the 40 foot drop and rip currents below claim lives every year.

The Blue Ridge Parkway

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The entire Blue Ridge Parkway scenic drive is worth your time, and there are plenty more sights to discover along the way!

 

Did I miss anything? Let me know!

 

Trail Guide: 6 Killer Hiking Trails in Kentucky’s Red River Gorge

For Kentuckians, the Red River Gorge is known and loved both for its climbing and trails. I am not a climber, so I stuck to the trails on my recent visit.

The Gorge, as it is lovingly referred to by locals, offers tons of different trails for almost all skill levels, all with different activities and sights to see. Some of the best seasons to visit the Gorge are in Spring and Fall, with the flowers blooming and leaves changing respectively. From arches to vistas, this Red River Gorge Trail Guide covers 6 hikes in the Gorge worth a visit, and provides some Natural Bridge State Park and Red River Gorge hiking tips!

(Copperas Falls, a beautiful spot)

Whistling Arch Trail: At around a half mile round trip and minimal elevation gain, this trail offers a sizable arch and an overlook over the valley below. The Red River Gorge has about 150 arches, its arch concentration second only to Utah’s Arches National Park, and the Whistling Arch is an excellent example!

Angel’s Windows Trail: Another short and sweet hike, this trail offers a double arch. The trail is about a half mile total and has little elevation change. These are some of the more intricate arches, making this arguably one of the Red River Gorge’s best hikes. The arch on the far side looks like a horse to some people; check out the photo below and tell me what you think.

Jump Rock: This is more of a swimming hole than a hike, but still well worth the trip. From the Sheltowee Connector Trail #211 lot off Sky Bridge Rd, it is a quick walk out to Jump Rock along the Red River. The rock is safe to jump off and the river is safe to swim across, although I would still recommend being a strong swimmer, and don’t recommend diving off the rock. The current is not strong, and the river is deep enough that you don’t have to worry about hurting yourself jumping. When we went, there were about 40 yellow monarch butterflies around the river and the surrounding trials.

Disclaimer: I did not jump or swim here, because it was 64 degrees when we visited. My sister swam, and has done the jump with a group in the past.

The Natural Bridge and Hanson’s Point Trails: Located in Natural Bridge State Park rather than the Red River Gorge, the Natural Bridge is a short but steeper hike from the parking lot in the Natural Bridge State Park. The Natural Bridge is what it sounds like—a bridge of sandstone connecting two ridges and carved out by the wind that you can hike across. From the top of the Natural Bridge, you can see Hanson’s Point—a local told me that the overlook was called this but I haven’t been able to confirm online. After crossing the Natural Bridge, you can head out to Hanson’s Point to get a view of the bridge from a distance. From here, we continued out to Lookout Point to watch the sunset. Lookout Point offers really nice views of the valley below, and is arguably the best spot in the Natural Bridge State Park to watch the sunset.

Tip for Red River Gorge photos: I have heard that fog collects in the valley below the Natural Bridge and Hanson’s Point in the morning, both of which face the east, and it is a really cool place to shoot the sunrise above the clouds.

Devil’s Staircase Trail: Located in the Natural Bridge State Park between Hanson’s Point and Lookout Point, this “staircase” will lead you deep into walls of rock. It’s a cool and short hike, but not if you have bad knees, don’t like heights, or are not steady footed. Honestly it’s amazing what this park will call a staircase. I can’t believe I did that stupid hike.

Copperas Falls Trail (Copperas Creek Falls Trail): This is an unofficial trail near Osborne Bend Trial, and is a little tricky to follow and isn’t technically a hike in the Red River Gorge Geologic Area. If you can see Copperas Creek or the creek bed, you are headed in the right direction. This hike is just shy of four miles round trip and doesn’t have a whole lot of elevation gain, but you will have to climb over some trees, and even large rocks depending on which route you take. When you first start off on the trail, it will split off into two. Following the trail on the right will give you a faster and easier route to the falls. We followed to the left. It was probably more scenic, but we had to climb over boulders the size of cars, and I had cuts and bruises. From here, the trial has multiple creek crossings, so be aware that your feet might get wet. If you are going to go, I would recommend going earlier than May or after a big rain—the falls were more of a trickle than falls by the time we got there. Technically in the Gorge or not, Copperas Falls is one of the prettiest spots to hike in the Red River Gorge.

Another tip on Copperas Falls: there was a lot of trash lining the hike. I was able to get some of it, but I’m sure there will be more if you get the chance to visit, so bring a trash bag to collect as you go! It can seem like a pain to pick up after someone else, but if not you, who else will do it? Besides, there is no better way to appreciate nature than to leave a place better than you found it.

With arches, rivers, cliffs, and waterfalls, you really can’t go wrong when planning a hiking trip in the Red River Gorge. Questions, comments, concerns? Leave me a comment, or dm me on Instagram!

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